Catfish tosser says he was 'dumb redneck with a bad idea'

Posted June 12, 2017

Yes, the Penguins required slightly longer in Monday's Game 1-three goals spanning 4:10 during the first period-but the aftermath felt similar. Their 4-1 win in game two of the Stanley Cup Final sending a loud message that they're still the reigning champs and that the Predators are going to have to be a whole lot better in game three in Nashville to make this a series. Now we see whether they get off the mat.

"He speaks a little bit of Russian, but I played with some Russians too", the Canada native said. But when you hear him talk about hockey - "there's so many good guys in the game" - he sounds like a hockey player.

Proving that the quality of their shots on goal matters more than the quantity, the Pittsburgh Penguins were outshot by the Nashville Predators for the second straight game to start the Stanley Cup Final.

Guentzel scored on a rebound 10 seconds into the third off the pad of Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne.

It's one thing to know you were the better team.

Then, just over three minutes later, the Predators had their second own-goal in as many games, when Vernon Fiddler's skate knocked a bouncing puck through Rinne's five-hole - the goal officially goes to Scott Wilson, but equal credit should go to Phil Kessel, who earned the assist for sneaking the puck into a risky position.

Nashville may be home, but the Penguins have history on their side.

Rinne, who had previously not lost two in a row in these playoffs, allowed four goals on 25 shots. We score one, we don't stop. "We want to score more".

"Right now we are 100 percent in a result-orientated business", coach Peter Laviolette said.

Despite the struggles, Pittsburgh appeared to get a lift from Nick Bonino, who hobbled to the locker room early in the game after taking a P.K. Subban slap shot off the left foot. Pittsburgh had 11 shots on Rinne, and scored four times. It was Guentzel's second go-ahead shot in two games, after his late goal in Game 1 on Monday.

"Pekka has been terrific through this entire playoffs", Laviolette said. "There's things that we could have done".

Nashville finally broke through with a power-play goal from Ryan Ellis eight minutes and 20 seconds into the second period.

I'm not saying Subban was intimate with Crosby, but I bet he could tell you what Crosby had for the pregame meal.

"I treat this as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity", said the 34-year-old Rinne. Skating one-on-one against Olli Maatta, the Predators rookie turned Maatta inside out on a deke and then cut towards the net and went upstairs on goalie Matt Murray.

We had a 3-0 lead going into the second. For the Penguins to be able to skate out onto the ice in a big game with the confidence of having that kind of calm presence in their net is a huge advantage for them.

Guentzel tapped home a loose puck under the left arm of Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne at 16:27 of the first.

In the Stanley Cup Final, every play becomes magnified to the point that momentum can swing with every twist and turn, especially when the game is tied. Obviously it's not the situation we wanted to be coming here. Nashville became the first team since the National Hockey League began tracking the stat in 1957 to hold a team without a shot for an entire period during the Stanley Cup Final. There was no penalty. Last season, Murray started 21 playoff games, finishing the championship run with a.923 save percentage and a 2.08 goals against average.